explosm:

By Kris! New comics daily at Explosm.net!

romantique-rose:

"I love writing. I love the swirl and swing of words as they tangle with human emotions." - James A. Michener

(Source: eros-addict)

morethanphotography:

Pathway to the Light by TimothyGriesel

brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best

brieetlejuice:

The best episode

By far the best

(Source: compsognathids)

southpauz:

True story.

When I was in 7th Grade, I almost set an Elementary School on fire while trying to microwave a cookie.

I was working at the concessions stand during a basketball tournament (my team was required to work because the tournament was being hosted in my School district), and, because I was hungry, I decided to use the microwave to heat up my cookie. My teeth were very sore due to me getting dental braces that week, so I decided to microwave it for a minute so it could be really soft.

It set on fire. 

The smoke alarm went off throughout the school.

The sprinkler system went off.

Basketball games that were going on at the time were cancelled.

Everyone had to evacuate the school and wait for the Police and Fire Department to show up. 

I JUST WANTED A COOKIE.

pixography:

Salvador Dali ~ “Tristan and Isolde”, 1944

The figures of Tristan and Isolde depicted on this massive canvas were painted by Dali in 1944 as a backdrop for the ballet Bacchanale, performed to Wagner’s music and presented for the first time in 1944 on the stage of the International Theater in New York. The tale of this ballet, for which Dali wrote the libretto, began before the war. At that time that title was Mad Tristan. It was to be performed in Paris with the choreography by Leonide Massine, the scenery by Prince Charvachidze, and costumes on which Coco Chanel wished to use real ermine and genuine precious stones. The war prevented the production in Paris, and later the Marquis Georges de Cuevas decided to stage the spectacle in New York. "As with everything else," Dali writes in The Secret Life, "my Mad Tristan, which was to have been my most successful theatrical venture, could not be given; so it became Venusberg and finally Bacchanale, which is the definitive version.”